books through the eyes of a dog

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I had a horribly vivid dream on Saturday night.

It was about our beloved dog Hazel and I woke up covered in sweat and surprised

my screaming wasn’t audible.

Dreams are interesting, aren’t they?

They feel so real but often the scenarios are far-fetched with the tiniest

shard of truth mixed in.

It took me quite awhile to return to slumber and I slept later than Carl on Sunday

morning.

The moment I tumbled out of bed, I found Hazel waiting patiently at the glass hall door,

opened it quickly and beckoned her to come and lay beside my side of the bed.

I didn’t mind the incessant panting that has arrived with her senior dog status,

I simply wanted her to be close to me.

Later in the day, I was chatting to Courtney about this doggy dream and we agreed

part of the reason must be seeing the reality of Hazel’s aging process.

She has the mind and personality of a puppy but her body is stiff and betrays her.

Her senses are starting to fail her and there is not anything we can do to halt this stage.

Since books have been a great topic in our home this month, to lighten up the mood,

she and I batted back and forth the books we thought Hazel would like and dislike.

Perhaps because of the dream or that October still has 10 more days,

bear with me as I share a dog’s perspective on books.

In Hazel’s words, of course.

Hazel’s Favorite Books:

 

go dog go

Go Dog Go-Two words…dog party!

 

my dog carl

Good Dog, Carl-I laugh every time I think of my
master (Carl) being a dog.

martha speaks

Martha Speaks-This is a great book
for a family who wonders what it would
be like if their dog started to speak.
I am thankful my family understands
everything I say.

Hazel’s not so favorite books:

I get in trouble for picking up crumpled up Kleenex.

My family doesn’t like it too much.

If they would stop reading these types of

books or watching the movies based on these

books, it would help me stay out of trouble.

old_yeller

Old Yeller

where the red fern grows

Where The Red Fern Grows

Hachiko-Waits

Hachiko Waits

 

What’s your favorite book about dogs or animals?

every morning and evening

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 “Starbucks might cause me to start drinking coffee again!”

I had given up coffee nearly two years ago.

Drinking coffee is perfectly fine but for me; it started to take over my life.

It had begun as a morning tradition and seeped into an evening habit.

Slowly I began thinking about coffee again.

Perhaps it was the weather change or living in Portland, Oregon.

It is hard to live in a city where the slightest shift in wind direction bathes

the air  with the intoxicating aroma of freshly roasted coffee.

Whatever the reason, I missed coffee.

Tea was a worthy substitute.

I cozied up with Earl Grey or English Breakfast and

applauded my fortitude.

While my husband pondered my absurd proclamation,

knowing he missed our shared coffee ritual,

I launched into my rationale.

I had innocently pulled my car up to a coffee window to order my

favorite tea latte only to learn

my tea of choice were being phased out.

The new teas would arrive in November.

November!

I had put my hopes in a substitute only to have it wrestled from my grasp.

My husband patiently listened as I presented my case from my passenger seat.

He reminded me there was nothing wrong with drinking coffee again.

Gradually my resolve was weakening as we finished our last errand.

He then demonstrated the most loving selfless act,

he took me to a different Starbucks counter and encouraged

me to try again.

He wondered if I might receive a different answer.

We left armed with a steaming paper cup of tea,

a smile on my face and a mini-crisis adverted.

Coffee has reminded me of old ways.

My old life was filled with weightier matters than my hot beverage preferences.

Coming to Christ has meant turning my back on the nudges of my old life.

New life isn’t free from tormenters who make it their aim to recapture me.

“For forty days,
the Philistine came forward every morning and evening
and took his stand.”

I Samuel 17:16

There are tormenters or Goliaths in my life who wage a relentless pursuit, armed

and ready to take a stand against new life in Christ.

Their tactics create a shadow across the life I inhabit.

They whisper questions as familiar as those uttered by the snake to Eve.

They hope to lull me into a state of forgetfulness and create alluring visions

of momentary pleasures disguised as detrimental needs.

Jesus freely extends an overflowing cup of new life.

Every morning and evening I choose Jesus.

I only need to ask him once but often, I need confirmation that

I truly belong to Him.

His answer never changes.

He tenderly speaks to me from the full measure of His character and

obliterates my fear of  losing His presence

or discovering His resources depleted.

He inhabits the lives of others to continue to steady my path.

He’s revealed in my husband who is well acquainted with my weaknesses

yet clasps my fingers in his and guides me back to where I belong.

 

Every morning and evening,

I  not only choose new life,

I receive new life.

A new life which towers over

every competitor with grace,

goodness and peace.

Forever grateful, He welcomes coffee and tea drinkers alike.

**********

I am linking up with others from The High Calling community
as we share stories about Finding New Life.
Read other stories here.

ways to read more books

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Most people want to read more.

Many people feel guilty they don’t read at all.

You don’t have to feel this way any longer.

I have several tips to bring reading back into your daily reality.

  • Pick a book or two

    This may seem obvious but chances are if you aren’t reading,
    it might have to do with not having a book picked out.
    Or you may have a book you have picked up several times to read
    and you can’t seem to make any progress.
    Put down that book and find another one.
    You are an adult and you will not be punished for not finishing a book
    you are not enjoying.
    Determine if you like fiction or non-fiction.
    Choose a book which interests you or one you keep hearing mentioned.
    Start with a book that is less than 300 pages.
    When you are trying to get back into a rhythm of reading, now is not the
    time to read War and Peace.
    Go to the library or to your favorite book store and look
    at the staff recommendations.
    Ask a friend what they are reading.
    Post the question to Facebook for book titles.
    Choose two books, begin one and if it doesn’t interest you,
    start the other book.
  • Be prepared and make a new habit
    I used to fill my water bottle and leave it behind on the counter
    instead of taking it in the car.
    I would walk right back my reusable grocery bags and arrive
    at the store without them.
    It took countless attempts before I developed the habit of never
    being without my water bottle and my grocery bags.
    Get in the habit of carrying your book with you.
    This is the best way to capture bonus minutes to read when you
    least expect to find any time.
    Waiting at the doctor’s office or for a child’s practice to end
    are stolen moments to sneak a few pages.
    There are any number to times when reading can be done
    instead of scrolling our phone screens.
  • Be an unspoken for time detective
    No matter how busy we are, there is always
    unspoken for time.
    It’s the time when we sit back and watch television
    or when we mindlessly click away on our computers.
    It could be when we simply procrastinate.
    Be ruthless and find those moments that don’t
    belong to anything and cash them in for reading time.
    I have heard just reading 15 minutes per day,
    an average speed reader could read 20
    books each year.
    Got 15 minutes?
    Read.
    Mute the television.
    Read during commercials.
  • Drop Everything And Read
    When my daughters were in school,
    they practiced DEAR time or
    Drop 
    Everything and Read.
    Lately I have been 
    following this mantra while
    Caleb logs his 
    school reading minutes.
    It normally occurs 
    around the time
    I should be making dinner 
    but I try to drop everything
    and find a place to sit 
    down and read.
    It is always a struggle to drop
    everything and often I Caleb is almost finished by
    the time I sit down.
    I am working on it day by day but I am discovering
    this is a great way to sneak in a little extra
    reading time.
  • Read book blogs
    I have grown to love reading blogs
    dedicated to books.
    Some are informative and alert me to
    new books while others are just plain funny.

    Here are a few of my favorites and
    a simple website for determining what
    book you should read next based on your
    reading history.

    Book Riot
    Modern Mrs. Darcy
    The Barnes and Noble Blog
    What Should I Read Next

As I write this post,
it is a dark rainy day in Portland,
Caleb’s soccer practice has been cancelled,
I know the perfect book to fill some unexpected time.

Happy Reading!

currently reading

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Here’s a quick look at what I am currently reading.

A book I have always intended to read:

The Alchemist

Have you read it?

What took me so long?

A book from a much beloved series:

After years of repeatedly seeing Outlander on

countless favorite book list,

I decided I would read just the first book.

I had no intention of reading the series.

Well never mind because like Caleb I want

to know what happens to the characters and

why mess with a sure thing.

Enter Dragonfly in Amber (book 2 in the Outlander series)

I took the Good Reads challenge this year and I think

it is only fair that each Outlander book count for 3 books as

most are over 900 pages.

Oh well.

A book residing on my bookshelf with a bookmark:

An Arrow Pointing To Heaven is a devotional biography

about singer/songwriter Rich Mullins by James Bryan Smith.

I happened to watch the movie Ragamuffin based on Mullins

life recently and decided to restart the book

and finally finish it.

So many of his songs comprise the soundtrack of my faith

and I am enjoying the glimpse into the faith of a man

who strewn words and music together so brilliantly.

A book I couldn’t leave the store without bringing home:

Friendships fascinate me.

In Friends for the Journey, acclaimed writers

Madeleine L’ Engle and Luci Shaw take turns

sharing about their rich friendship.

The centerpiece of the book is Madeleine and Luci’s friendship

but they also share about the other important relationships

in their lives over the years.

Each page makes me cling a little tighter to my friends.

What are reading?

**********

Coming up:

  • Ways to read more books
  • Part 2 of the book interview with my daughters

 

 

a quartet of books

31 days of books has been the result a repeated question from

my friend Karen,

“Why don’t you share what you are reading?” 

Well it has taken me half of the month to get back to

the origins of this series.

Today I will share 4 books from different genres.

I will add more in the days to come.

Click the book cover for the links.

 

invisible girls

The Invisible Girls is a moving memoir which recounts
Sarah’s battle with breast cancer in her 20’s and a
chance encounter with a Somali refuge family and the
mostly unlikely of friendships that ensues.
This is the most brief and basic description of this book.
It is one of the most beautiful true stories of redemption
I have ever read.I am stunned I forgot to list it among
my favorite memoir posts.

I had the pleasure of hearing Sarah speak prior to reading
the book and if you ever get a chance to hear her in person,
make it happen. She lives here in Portland, Oregon.

dancing on the head of a pin

I plan to write a post on my favorite books
about the writing practice during this series.
I finished this book last week.
I have a very tender spot for Robert Benson
as he is the author of one
of my most treasured prayer books, Venite.

The thing about writing is one must write.
The problem is that if you spend too much time
trying to work your way through most writing books
you never have time to pick up a pen.
In way less than 200 pages, Robert Benson
shares lessons and gems which have guided
him along the writers path.
I am so appreciative for the way he has generously
shared from his wealth of experience and wisdom.
I came away with new and unique ways
to communicate the written word.

parnassus-on-wheels

I read this book on Sunday. It is a
novella. I might begin to only read novellas
as it was very 
satisfying to start and finish a sweet
story on the same day.
This book was written in the 1900’s
about a woman who buys what
we would call today a book mobile from
a traveling vagabond.
A funny delightful story.

the nesting place

We live in a world where it is easy to
be discontent with our surroundings.
I must admit, I am just as prone as
anyone to look around my home and
find all the flaws.
I am positive I have never seen homes pictured
in magazines with an assortment of sports
balls under most pieces of furniture.
Nope that would be my house and the
camera crews have yet to schedule
a photo shoot.

The Nesting Place takes you gently
by the hand and helps the renter or
the homeowner embrace their homes
in its varying states of imperfection.
It’s not about perfection, it is about
making a house a home and the multitude
of ways this can be accomplished.
This would be a perfect gift for newlyweds.

 

What have you read recently?

 

 

chatting books with my girls

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From left to right, meet Carlen aka Len or Lenny Lou, age 25 (gulp!) and
Courtney aka Court, Coco or Nee Nee, age 21 (another gulp!).
They are all things wonderful and delightful. I believe they are in the throes of
a precious sweet spot in their sister friendship.
It is swoon worthy to behold.
Just look at those money smiles.
I mean that literally smiles made from MONEY ;)
Worth every penny.

I can’t tell you how much fun I had talking to Caleb first about books and then
spending some time on Saturday afternoon while these two
discussed books and recalled memories of their childhood.

My challenge to you is start having conversations with others about books.
Especially the books you read as children. I guarantee you will learn something
about one another and create new connections.
I have loved reading your comments here and on Facebook.
Keep the conversation going!

     **********

We gathered around our dining room table with an assortment of Dutch Brothers,
Starbucks and an energy drink to discuss books.
I merely was a spectator, a note taker and from time
to time lobbed out questions when I was able to get in a word.
We ran out of time so this will be the first of a two-part conversation with my girls.

Me: Girls, I initially asked you to tell me your 5 or so favorite books, which you did
with some difficulty. So after my interview with Caleb, I decided you two deserved
equal time and I know we will appreciate your perspective. So thanks for agreeing
to sit down with me.

The Girls: Sure!

Me: Okay, let’s start with your favorite childhood books. Throw out some titles.

Court: The Seven Silly Eaters, that cake looked so good.

seven silly eaters

Len: Oh that was a good book. I liked that too.
I also liked Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed,
Miss Rumphius, the one where everyone is laying all over
the old lady, what was it called?

Me: The Napping House.

Len: Yes, The Napping House, I loved that book.
Also Chrysanthemum and Owen.
I loved Kevin Henkes.
Oh Stellaluna.

Me: We all loved Kevin Henkes!

Court: I liked A Bad Case of the Stripes,

Bamboozled with that really crazy house

bamboozled book
and The Stinky Cheese Man.

Len: Any of the If You Give… books and the book about the Koala Bear.

Me: Oh yes, Koala Lou!
Koala Lou, I do love you!

The Girls: YES!

Me: Okay, let’s move onto favorite books read aloud by your dear mother.

The Girls: The Secret Garden (laughter erupts).

Me: The Secret Garden was almost your last read aloud.

The Girls: The accent was hilarious. (more laughter)

Me: Yes, I tried my best to do an English accent but you both teased me mercilessly.
So glad we brought this up, I was almost over the humiliation.

Court: Hinds Feet on High Places and Inkheart.

Len: My Father’s Dragon and the Narnia books.

my fathers dragon

Caleb: (from the living room) Oh, I liked My Father’s Dragon, I read
all three of the books.

The Girls: The Ear, the Eye and the Arm!
We loved that book.

Me: Have you both always loved reading?

Len: Nope.

Court: Yes, absolutely.

Me: Tell me more Carlen.

Len: I didn’t like being told what books to read in school.
It seemed to take all the joy out of reading.

Court: Carlen,I remember when Mom tried to get you to read Harry Potter when
it first came out. I would watch you sit on the couch and move your head back and
forth. I was like, there is no way you are reading Carlen.
You were faking it.

Len: (laughs with a cackle) I know. I did not want to read that book. I just
wasn’t into that book. I wasn’t into magic and there was so much talk
about that book at the time.

Me: Yeah, despite all the controversy about Harry Potter at the time,
I was trying anything to get you back into wanting to read. I just
prayed you would find your way back to books.

Me: How long did it take you get back into enjoying reading and
what was the spark?

Len: I read Bridge to Terabithia when I was in 5th grade. It was a book
that Mom had always encouraged me to read. It was always on the book
tables she set up for Reading Is Fundamental. It was a book that taught
me not to judge a book by its cover.

bridge to terabithia

Me: That book was a healing book as you dealt with the death of a classmate in 5th grade.
Terabithia meant a lot to both of us.
Remember going to hear Katherine Paterson lecture downtown
the same year.
We went to the book signing but I think we were both
too emotional to even approach her.

Me: Court, you have always loved to read books. Why?

Court: I don’t know. I just do. I like how you can picture the story that is being told.
It’s different from watching a movie or television.
I just need to read.

Len: I love watching Court read. She sits in her favorite chair and she is all
curled up. I watch her facial expressions and it makes me want to know what
she is reading and even to read the book.
I think it is her way to relax.

Court: Yeah, I agree.

Me: Okay, girls. We have to get to Caleb’s soccer game.
Can we take up this conversation later?

The Girls: Sure. Absolutely, this has been a blast.

Next weekend, we’ll talk about favorite authors, what is it about the books
assigned in middle school, the books they have read multiple times
and the never-ending debate of read the book first or see the movie first,
then read the book.
Oh and I want to know about Court’s uncanny ability to read books
light years before they become huge hits. She’s got the gift.
And perhaps why I could never get either of you to read Nancy Drew.

**********

What are your favorite books to read aloud?

Do you do accents?

books make us happy

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I had the pleasure of chatting with the youngest member of the Washington family
about all things books.
Please welcome Caleb as he shares why books make him happy.

Me (aka Helen aka Mom): Hi Caleb. Thanks so much for taking time to talk to me
about books.

Caleb: Sure, anytime.

Me: Caleb, before we start talking about books. Tell me about what you like
to do.

Caleb: Well, I like to read books. (Caleb laughs uncontrollably)
I like to ride my bike, my scooter, my skateboard and do lots of sports like soccer,
basketball and football.
I play chess and like to sleep.
I also like to sleepover with friends and hang out with my family.
Oh, I like doing stop motion animation with my Lego guys.
I also like to sleep.

Me: I would guess this is why your pajamas are your favorite clothing.
(Personally I think he is still making up for not sleeping much his first two
years of life…but what do I know?)

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Me: What were your favorite picture books when you were little?

Caleb: I liked the Pigeon books, Little Bear and The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

Me: Oh, I love Little Bear.

Caleb: I know Mom.

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Me: Do you remember when you began to read on your own?
What were your favorite books?

Caleb: Nate the Great, those Fly Guy books and My Weird School.
Remember how Nate would always say, “I, Nate the Great…”?

Me: Yes and I remember you took to saying I, Caleb the Great as well.
You worked really hard to read every book in the My Weird School series.

Caleb: Yeah, I always went straight to the library computer to find the books
I hadn’t read and put them on hold.

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Me: What book(s) did you enjoy having read aloud to you?

Caleb: The End of the Beginning. That book was so funny.

Me: If I didn’t know before we read that book, I knew afterwards that
you have an incredible sense of humor. The book has humor that slowly builds
as the stories unfolds and when you laughed, it made me laugh hard as well.
Then you would grab the book and 
make me let you read the funny part over again.
Of course we would start laughing all over again.

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Me: Between you and your sisters, you are the undisputed champion regarding
reading book series. What is it about series of books that you like so much?

Caleb: The reason I like to read books that are in a series is that if the first book
is good, I know the second book will be even better. I don’t like the stories
to end and I like to know what happens to the characters. Why read something
else when you have a sure thing?

Me: So naturally Caleb, share your favorite book series.

Caleb: The Secret Zoo, Percy Jackson and the Olympians, The Strange Case 
of Origami Yoda, The Amulet Series,The Diary of a Wimpy Kid series
and Harry Potter.

Me: Caleb, if you could recommend any book to another 11 year-old,
what would it be and why?

Caleb: Percy Jackson and the Olympians. The books draw me in and they
are full of action, suspense and mythology.
They are just full of surprises.

Me: What books are you reading now?

Caleb: Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus and The Lost Hero.
And you and I are going to read another Harry Potter book together.

Me: Caleb thanks so much for talking to me about books.

Caleb: No prob.

Me: And I hope the photographer who takes your pictures when you graduate
from high school, has just as much trouble catching you in the frame!

Caleb: Mommmmmm!
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when you need to laugh

bernadette2

 

Summer time is when I do the bulk of my fiction reading.

However, I have noticed a slight shift lately and I may start

to tip the scales in favor of fiction over non-fiction

throughout the year.

Most summers there is one book that leaps to the top

of my favorite reads.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette was a grand slam of

a pick a couple of summers ago.

The book is set in Seattle so for those of us residing in the

Pacific Northwest, our region comes to life and provides

ample reasons to laugh at ourselves.

If you don’t live in these parts, you get a glimpse in all its hilarity of

the extremes of being a northwestern-er.

The book is told primarily in text messages, emails and letters.

I would say it is one of the most original books I have ever read

and completely laugh out loud funny.

It didn’t matter how gorgeous the weather or plans we had,

all I wanted to do was sit in a chair (a deck chair outside at least)

and read, chuckle, read, laugh and repeat.

I am not going to give anymore details away as I believe

it is best to dive in without a map.

You will thank me.

Now for the few younger readers of this blog,

there is a bit of language.

I won’t go into all the side effects of using bad

language but just as a little reminder…

 

 

Enough said.

You have been warned.

 

Life can be a quite serious affair,

we can all do with a laugh from time to time.

 

for the love of memoirs

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Sunbeams bounce off the stack of book beckoning dust particles to flight

and announcing the passing of a day.

My son has arisen from his virus-induced stupor and occupies himself with homework

of days gone by.

The rising,

the setting,

of the sun

and all that is compressed between east and west

is a day in the life.

At day’s end, we could write a daily memoir.

I suppose that really is what a diary or a journal compiles.

I imagine most people wouldn’t consider their lives interesting enough

for public consumption.

Yet aren’t we curious about other people’s lives and thoughts?

Memoirs give us that “fly on the wall” experience.

Memoirs have become one of my favorite genres to read.

The books picture at the top of this page are ones I grabbed

from my shelves and baskets.

It is by no means an exhaustive list but books which have

knitted themselves deep into my soul.

(I am just now remembering I forgot Cold Tangerines.)

Click the book title link for synopsis information.

Below each title will be my brief attempt to explain why

the book is found on my stack.

Found: A Story of Questions, Grace & Everyday Prayer

I remember early marriage and parenthood. I remember trying to
figure out that delicate balance of trying to do it all, carve out an
identity and stay close to God.
Reading this book took me back to that time and even now, I still
try to juggle it all with less flexible hands. I am a sucker for someone
who is sweet on the Benedictine monks and likes to hang out with them.
This book reminded me of the joy of realizing the God you fear
is hiding is simply waiting to be found.
Marvelous grace.

Girl Meets God

Lauren Winner was raised by a Jewish father and a lapsed Southern Baptist mother.
She became an Orthodox Jew.
This memoir is about how she became a Christian.

My Christian make-up has looked different over the years.
Perhaps depending on what

church I was attending.
At times, I have felt an outsider.

Other times, I have felt I had to be separate.
Although Lauren Winner and I have very different religious experiences,
reading this book gave me freedom to grab back practices
I mistakenly felt I needed to abandon.

Truly I want my faith to look like God and not a church.

Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith

This was the first book that blew open the door to 
being real in matters of faith.
Anne was everything that this good girl was not and was
too afraid to admit,
I was only a whisper away from being not so good.

I don’t think I have read any of her books without nodding and 
“uhuh-ing” and laughing.
She helped me see all of life as a sacred hilarious faith walk.
She prodded me to pay attention long enough to see God
right there in the midst of the most simple things.
When faced with the mundane,
I am confronted with the Holy.
(P.S. I dragged Carl to a reading years ago to hear
Anne and we laughed ourselves silly.
Bucket list-check.)

Blue Like Jazz

I was 10 years late to the party for this book but right on time for me.
If Anne Lamott opened the door to thinking about faith from a different
vantage point.
Donald Miller thrust back the hangar door.
I am not sure I can adequately describe why this book had 
such an impact other than I read it quickly,
I didn’t underline much because of the speed. 
It was page after to page of confirmation
of my thoughts about faith.
I didn’t know that in less than a month after reading this book,
we would be leaving our church and would land in the church
he helped plant.
This book helped me to remain in church.

An Altar in the World

It is always hard to pick a favorite but if I did,
it would be An Altar in the World.
If the last two books, gave me permission to ask
questions and to think differently about faith.
This book was the one which wrapped its paper
arms around me and showed me my reflection.
So much of this blog is about paying attention
and striving to see the spiritual in the natural.
Barbara Brown Taylor declared from every
page, “Me too, Helen. Me too.”

Craving Grace: A Story of Faith, Failure and my Search for Sweetness

If you have ever been a chronic rule follower, a perfectionist,
or someone who felt they could obey well enough to earn God’s
love, you will speed through these pages.
I cringed for the girl I have been and the woman who still wants to 
be good enough for God.
God is not armed with a measuring stick.
He is all grace.

Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion

My friend Paige and I have a long distance book club. We send
each other books we love, in hopes of the gift of shared book affection.
Paige sent me Tattoos and I was riveted.
Gregory Boyle began a gang-intervention program in Los Angeles called
Homeboy Industries. The stories chronicled in this book will break
your heart and deposit hope into your soul.
I was reminded what a difference extending compassion rather than
judgment can make in another person’s life.
Thank you Paige!

Traveling with Pomegranates

Sometimes books are just made for dreaming.
I can only dream that my mother and I would be able to take
several trips to Greece, Turkey and France.
But Sue Monk Kidd and her daughter Ann Kidd Taylor didn’t
dream, they lived the experience and documented it.
Perhaps this book also possessed a piece of reality as Sue
was turning 50 and so was I.
Her daughter was 21 and so was one of mine.
It was a glimpse inside both women’s attempts to grapple with
these milestone ages and their relationship now as adults.
If you have read The Secret Life of Bees, this books hints
of those buzzing bees to come.
If you just like to read about travel with a mixture of some
mysticism, I know you will enjoy this book.

Three days absence= one long post

More shorter posts on the way this week.
I promise.

Hooray for memoirs.

What’s your favorite memoir?

 

 

transitional reading

rebecca1

Do you remember the first time you read a book that

grabbed you  by the hand,

transported you from childhood and

ever so gently escorted you towards adulthood?

This was my experience when I read

Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca.

Early in my high school years,

I asked my mother for a book suggestion.

She was the perfect person as she was an avid reader

and had worked at our public library for years.

She gave me several titles but the only one to be found

waiting for me on a library shelf was Rebecca.

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.

I read the opening sentence and barely looked up until I was finished.

I was captured by the mystique of the plot about a second wife

trying to deal with the immense shadow of the first Mrs. Maxim

de Winter.

Rebecca was a perfect blend of suspense

and romance contained in an oppressive mansion called Manderley,

My only reference to housekeepers at the time had been Alice

from The Brady Bunch so Mrs. Danvers

was indeed the most sinister of housekeepers

I could ever envision.

I loved the story and every few years, I grab a copy

and revisit the Cornish countryside and

marvel how a book written in 1938 can

consistently command

my attention and appreciation.

It was a thriller but it also was my first

“adult” book.

What book made you feel like you were 

closing in on adulthood?

How many book opening lines do you know?